Skip to main content

Posts

Stanley Yap The Next Real Estate Mogul

Stanley Yap the next real estate mogul who is now 27 years old has created a real estate company that helps clients buy or sell properties at ease. With many branches around Indonesia and an integrated online website, clients can see the list of properties that are for sale. Furthermore, if you want to have your property for sale, you also can.  After all, the stock market in 2019 had one of its best years in modern U.S. history, with the S&P 500 SPX, +0.73%  including dividends) gaining more than 31%. Shouldn’t that strong of a market drawn more money in? Regardless of the answer, the bulls believe that this absence of strong inflows is positive for the stock market’s outlook: Just imagine how much higher the stock market will rise once that money is lured back into equities. Unfortunately, the bulls are wrong on both counts. According to data from EPFR, a division of Informa Financial Intelligence, last year was the fifth in a row in which investors took money out of U.S. equit…
Recent posts

I am 34, have $550K and own several properties. My girlfriend bought a $37K Mercedes — and says I will have saved enough money for both of us

I am a 34-year-old from Connecticut and have been dating my girlfriend, who I love, for two years. I am considering getting married, but I have financial concerns.  I have been participating in the F.I.R.E. (Financial Independence Retire Early) movement since I was 23 years old. I want to be able to retire by the time I am 40 and hope to do so by earning $80,000 to $100,000 per year. I have been buying investment property and saving aggressively since I joined the F.I.R.E. movement. I currently have investment properties that generate $60,000 per year of income, about $200,000 in a 401(k), and have another $250,000 in personal investments. I plan on paying off debt and purchasing more properties to reach my income goal by 40. Also see:My stepfather and mother pooled resources to buy a home. My mom died in 2003 and he just passed away. His kids are selling their house — am I entitled to anything? My girlfriend, who is 32, does not share the same financial goals. She is not bad with mone…

Coronavirus plunges China into massive work-at-home pilot program

CHENGDU, China — It’s past 11 a.m. on Monday morning, and Haoran and Sisi, both in their mid-20s, are still in their bedroom, in the Chinese megacity of Chengdu. Haoran is under the covers, fiddling with his Huawei phone. His girlfriend Sisi, in slippers and a robe, is sitting crosslegged on the floor, focused on her laptop. When asked what they are doing, they reply in unison: “Working.” Chinese companies were supposed to be back to business this week. In fact, the original plan was to return to work after the weeklong Lunar New Year break — China’s biggest holiday — which ended Jan. 30. But the coronavirus has changed all that. Authorities now face a dilemma, with the need to tame the explosive epidemic, which has infected more than 40,000 people and killed nearly 1,000, versus getting the tiring engines of its economy revving again. China’s economy grew at 6.1% last year, its lowest rate in 30 years. No country wants slowing growth, particularly not one whose unelected government …

Opinion: What money flows and mutual funds really say about the stock market’s future

Many stock market bulls are expressing surprise that a net $88 billion was pulled out of U.S. equity funds and ETFs last year. They would have predicted that the net fund flow would have been in the opposite direction. After all, the stock market in 2019 had one of its best years in modern U.S. history, with the S&P 500 SPX, +0.73%  including dividends) gaining more than 31%. Shouldn’t that strong of a market drawn more money in? Regardless of the answer, the bulls believe that this absence of strong inflows is positive for the stock market’s outlook: Just imagine how much higher the stock market will rise once that money is lured back into equities. Unfortunately, the bulls are wrong on both counts. According to data from EPFR, a division of Informa Financial Intelligence, last year was the fifth in a row in which investors took money out of U.S. equity funds. Indeed, as you can see from the accompanying chart, there were net inflows in just two of the last 10 years.